CWEA’s Public Education Committee is calling on all amateur, semi-pro and professional film makers who want to showcase their training or public education video relating to the wastewater treatment in California during the 2011 Film Festival. Start thinking NOW about your entry… it’s not too early! The winning film in each of the three categories will be showcased at the Annual Conference 2011 in Ontario April 12-15!  Stay tuned for more information coming soon! Questions? Contact Mike Auer.

And here’s a sample video on the wastewater recycling facility in El Segundo, owned by West Basin Municipal Water District and operated by United Water…

www.WorkforWater.org is the place where students and job seekers can explore green careers, and utilities will find a clearinghouse of resources for recruiting in the wonderful world of water.  Developed by the American Water Works Association and Water Environment Federation, the world’s leading technical experts on drinking water and water quality, this site is packed with resources to find jobs or prepare for rewarding careers in protecting public health and the environment. Learn about what it takes to work for water and get a great job for a great cause! The site has landing pages for four audiences: high school and vocational school students, college students, second career and retired military job seekers, and advanced science professionals. For more information, visit www.WorkforWater.org.

EPA has issued a new report that estimates that nationwide capital investment needs for wastewater and stormwater pollution control will be more than $298 billion over the next 20 years. The 2008 Clean Watersheds Needs Survey summarizes the results of the agency’s 15th national survey on publicly owned treatment works needs. The estimate includes $192 billion for wastewater treatment and collection systems, $64 billion for combined sewer overflow corrections and $42 billion for stormwater management. The report documents a $43 billion (17 percent) increase (in constant 2008 dollars) in investment needs over the previous 2004 report. The increase is due to a combination of improved reporting, aging infrastructure, population growth and more protective water quality standards. In addition to the $298 billion in wastewater and stormwater needs, other needs for nonpoint source pollution prevention ($23 billion) and decentralized/onsite wastewater systems ($24 billion) are included in the report. The report is a collaborative effort between 47 states, the District of Columbia, U.S. territories, and EPA. From February 2008 through April 2009, states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories collected and provided data for the report.

More information on the report: http://www.epa.gov/cwns

Bill Bertera

Bill Bertera

Bill Bertera, WEF’s executive director for the past ten years, has announced that he will be leaving the organization effective December 31, 2010.  He will leave the organization with an outstanding history of accomplishments and in a good position to continue its role as a leading water organization. Over the months ahead, Mr. Bertera will maintain his ongoing role as Executive Director, with programs and operations continuing uninterrupted.

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The U.S. Supreme Court on June 1 refused to hear claims from the city of Los Angeles that the Kern County sludge ban violated the interstate commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution. As is customary, the court did not explain its decision not to hear the challenge to the Kern County ban. Approved in 2006, Measure E made it illegal to spread biosolids on farmland as fertilizer. Los Angeles, Orange County and the businesses that haul and spread their waste here filed a lawsuit with a number of claims against Measure E. The June 1 Supreme Court decision not to take L.A.’s case leaves in place a previous victory for Kern County in the form of rulings by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that declared Measure E did not illegally hamper interstate commerce protections. The Supreme Court action removes the last federal claim against Measure E — leaving only two state-level legal challenges to the sludge ban’s validity: a claim that Measure E violated state recycling rules in the Integrated Waste Management Act and that Kern County overstepped its police powers by creating a law that polices another government entity.

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