The Kirt Brooks Memorial Water Environment Scholarship is a scholarship for students in or interested in the water environment industry who are members of CWEA or sponsored by CWEA members. Scholarships are given for the Fall – Summer school year following the application deadline. Applications are due on January 15 for the school year beginning the following September. Applicants are notified in March of their status/amount of award. The scholarships can be claimed after July 1st by sending CWEA an original proof of enrollment form from their college, trade school, or university. More details about the program are below.  Also, learn about the scholarship’s namesake, Kirt Brooks.

Read these application requirements carefully.

1. WHAT IS THE KIRT BROOKS MEMORIAL WATER ENVIRONMENT SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM?
The program provides annual scholarships for individuals attending a College, University, Community College or Technical Trade School and pursuing a course of study related to the Water Environment Field. It is awarded to applicants selected by the Scholarship Committee.

2. WHO MAY APPLY?
Members of CWEA and Individuals Sponsored by a Member of CWEA who are pursuing a career in the water environment industry are eligible to apply. Local Section or Committee activities are not substitutes for CWEA membership. Scholarship Committee members, CWEA staff, and their relatives are not eligible.

Click here to learn more

Collection System of the Year (0-249 Miles) awarded to the Fairfield Suisun Sewer District. (credit: Redwood Empire LS)

Collection System of the Year (0-249 Miles) awarded to the Fairfield Suisun Sewer District. (credit: Redwood Empire LS)

Photos and winners from the Redwood Empire’s annual awards banquet in November. They also swore in their brand new Board of Directors.

Check out award photos here.

Winners included:

  • Public Education Person of the Year – Rob Cole from Central Marin Sanitation Agency
  • Operator of the Year - Tim Erskine from Easterly Wastewater Treatment Plant
  • Collection System of the Year (0-249 Miles) awarded to the Fairfield Suisun Sewer District
  • P3S Person of the Year (Pretreatment, Pollution Prevention and Stormwater) – Bob Adamson from Central Marin Sanitation Agency
  • Public Education Program Award – Wastewater Treatment Agencies of Marin County
  • Plant of the Year Safety Award -  Fairfield Suisun Sewer District
  • Mechanical Technician of the Year –  Dave Psaila, Easterly WWTP- Vacaville
  • Laboratory Person of the Year - Christina Harshell from Fairfield Suisun Sewer District
  • Operator in Training of the Year – Murray McKinnie Award – Jose Gutierrez
  • Electrical / Instrumentation Person of the Year – Jeff Boheim, Central Marin Sanitation Agency
  • Collection System Person of the Year - Antonio Barros from Central Marin Sanitation Agency
  • Engineering Achievement Award – Central Marin Sanitation Agency
  • Gimmicks & Gadgets Award - Warren Banzett

First published by SCAP, here are California Wastewater Climate Change Group (CWCCG) updates from Kris Flaig and Greg Adams on the past year and the coming year in climate change regulations…

By Kris Flaig
City of Los Angeles

Just when you think one part of the regulatory world might be slowing down, another part speeds up. And, so it has been during the past few months. The apparent lull of August was followed by the Herculean efforts by the State legislature to pass several hundred bills, several of which directly affect the SCAQMD, some of which could affect us all down the road. The Governor, true to his promise, signed a few and vetoed several, then called the legislature back to work for unfinished business. To benefit permittees in the South Coast Air Basin, SB 827 and AB 1318 were signed into law.
While legislative progress was made, POTWs are making some progress through the California Wastewater Climate Change Group (CWCCG). Our consultant, CH2M Hill, led by Jackie Kepke, is able to use the collaborative efforts of POTWs across the State (e.g., LACSD and BACWA), as well as NACWA and ACWA positions, to approach regulators. Jackie submitted comments to the ARB on Mandatory GHG Emission Reporting, providing feedback relative to a recent ARB Workshop, including comments on problems with reporting, and sampling and testing. In a letter to the ARB on Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Jackie expressed the need to exclude municipal wastewater (an essential public service) from a Cap and Trade Program, and for incentives combined with fewer regulatory hurdles for CHP to use renewable fuels. CWCCG leadership, led by Jackie, will be meeting with ARB senior staff regarding Cap and Trade issues. Jackie and her CH2M Hill colleagues also attend and report on specific workshops and webinars. The CWCCG Steering Committee is working closely with our consultant to effectuate the direction desired by the CWCCG Policy Committee.
A few months ago, we looked at the Waxman-Markey bill (HR 2454). Perhaps the greatest legislative bill of the past month would be the Kerry-Boxer bill (S 1766). Several differences are noted between the two bills. The first significant difference is that the W-M bill attempts to amend most energy bills that have been enacted during the past 30 years, while the K-B bill is largely silent on the subject. The second significant difference is that the W-M bill provides for extensive residential and commercial incentives, while the K-B bill provides more selectively targeted incentives and funding for (applied) research efforts. Although digester gas is not a popular word in the K-B bill, ‘natural gas’ includes renewable biogas. The K-B bill also establishes a simple means by which more GHGs can be added, and enables the administrator to require anyone to report their GHGs; the US President is also given specific powers to possibly expand the scope of the bill. This bill acknowledges The Climate Registry and the Western Climate Initiative, but ignores the federal Mandatory Reporting Rule. As with the W-M bill, the K-B bill does not address Title V requirements in a pragmatic or thoughtful manner; POTWs will need to educate their representatives on this. The K-B bill allows sources to exclude renewable biomass or gas, and directs the Administrator to delay specific NSPSrelated standards for GHGs until Jan 1, 2020. We might be interested that the K-B bill provides a mechanism for early action, suggests language for a federal short-term pre-exemption, and allows a State much more freedom within a GHG program.
Greg Adams, LACSD
Many climate change activities at the state and federal levels took off in earnest in 2009. State activities
included actions on CHP (combined heat and power), RES (the Renewable Electricity Standard), C&T (cap
and trade), etc. The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Waxman-Markey Bill, H.R. 2454, and the U.S. Senate EPW Committee passed the Kerry-Boxer Bill, S. 1733. (NACWA was also very active in both of these with SCAP member assists.). EPA released their endangerment finding, the final federal mandatory reporting rule and the “tailoring” rule, to name a few.
The SCAQMD permitting moratorium put the kibosh on receiving most new permits but SCAP was busy
supporting SCAQMD actions in Sacramento and following court proceedings as potential intervenors.
Much work was done on a proposed SCAQMD rule modeled after provisions of Section 185 of the federal Clean Air Act that could generate up to $35 million in Climate Change Activities
• Jackie Kepke of CH2M Hill was selected as the CWCCG coordinator
• CWCCG submitted comment letters on numerous proposed programs and regulations including combined heat and power (CHP) and the renewable electricity standard (RES)
• CWCCG met with CARB staff several times and prepared a cap and trade position paper for dissemination
• SCAP members assisted NACWA on legislative advocacy on both House and Senate climate change bills
SCAQMD Permit Moratorium
• SCAP members attended court proceedings, prepared to intervene
• SCAP issued support letters for various SCAQMD-sponsored legislation Proposed Rule 317 Clean Air Act Non-attainment Fees
• SCAP members attended numerous meetings and strategy sessions, visited SCAQMD Board members and EPA Assistant Administrator Gina McCarthy in an attempt to achieve a more reasonable rulemaking
Big Issues for 2010
• Resolve handling of biosolids facilities in the Priority Reserve
• Final resolution on PR 317
• Obtaining % allocations for adaptation in federal climate change bills
• Finalize WERF N2O, methane from collection systems and septic tank studies
• Monitor legislation and NGO activity dealing with re-activating the Priority Reserve lawsuits
• Keep CWCCG’s arms around AB 32 activities

The apparent lull of August was followed by the Herculean efforts by the State Legislature to pass several hundred bills, several of which directly affect the SCAQMD, some of which could affect us all down the road. The Governor, true to his promise, signed a few and vetoed several, then called the legislature back to work for unfinished business. [snip]

While legislative progress was made, POTWs are making some progress through the California Wastewater Climate Change Group (CWCCG). Our consultant, CH2M Hill, led by Jackie Kepke, is able to use the collaborative efforts of POTWs across the State (e.g., LACSD and BACWA), as well as NACWA and ACWA positions, to approach regulators. Jackie submitted comments to the ARB on Mandatory GHG Emission Reporting, providing feedback relative to a recent ARB Workshop, including comments on problems with reporting, and sampling and testing. In a letter to the ARB on Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Jackie expressed the need to exclude municipal wastewater (an essential public service) from a Cap and Trade Program, and for incentives combined with fewer regulatory hurdles for CHP to use renewable fuels. CWCCG leadership, led by Jackie, will be meeting with ARB senior staff regarding Cap and Trade issues. Jackie and her CH2M Hill colleagues also attend and report on specific workshops and webinars. The CWCCG Steering Committee is working closely with our consultant to effectuate the direction desired by the CWCCG Policy Committee.

[Read more]

On July 1, 2009, the Water Environment Research Foundation began an open access policy for research reports which are more than two years old. WERF is offering a host of free Research on the Treatment and Management of Residuals and Biosolids reports from its archives. These open access reports are free to the public as downloads and are marked in blue in the chart.

Key Highlights:

  • Almost a third of WERF’s research projects have focused on the treatment and management of residuals and biosolids.
  • This research is valued at over $20 million. Two of the six programs in WERF’s new program-directed research process launched in 2005 will continue work in this area – they include Solids Treatment, Residuals & Reuse and Wastewater Treatment & Reuse.
  • Key subscriber challenges are related to residuals and biosolids, including the Operations Optimization research programs, and Biosolids Pathogen Risk and Communication.
  • The biosolids TCR (Targeted Collaborative Research) program was set up by WERF to fund research on key biosolids-related issues identified in the 2003 WERF-EPA Biosolids Research Summit and by the TCR funding partners. Biosolids TCR funding partners include 12 WERF subscribers; each contributed between $5,000 to $50,000 per year for five years. To date, 55 projects have been completed and about 15 are ongoing.

4 Star Rating

4 Star Rating

Charity Navigator, America’s leading charity evaluator, has awarded Water For People its highest rating of four stars for the seventh consecutive year. This award is reserved for charities that demonstrate the highest levels of operational excellence and fiscal management.

Only 2% of the 5,000+ charities rated by Charity Navigator have achieved the remarkable feat of earning this award for seven or more consecutive years.

Founded in 1991, Water For People is a Denver-based private, nonprofit international humanitarian organization that supports the development of sustainable safe drinking water resources and improved sanitation facilities in developing countries. The organization has active water, sanitation, and hygiene education programs in 10 countries in Africa, Asia, and Central and South America.